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Side view fruit tree roots

Side view fruit tree roots



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Side view fruit tree roots and trunks of the world's fastest growing plants. This tree, Achnatherum hymenoides, grows in parts of eastern North America and Asia.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Fruit of the giant kudzu vine, Pueraria lobata, in Japan. This vine is native to Asia, but has naturalized and spread widely in eastern North America.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A fruit from a fruit of the giant kudzu vine, Pueraria lobata, in Japan.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Bare roots of American ginseng, Panax quinquefolium, growing in moist soil of North Carolina's Blue Ridge Mountains.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Leaf structure of the common reed, Phragmites australis. Leaves are an important food and shelter for many types of wildlife, including birds and bats.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Leaf structure of the common reed, Phragmites australis.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Common goutweed, Derris trifoliata. Goutweed grows along watercourses and is often a nuisance for water managers.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A view of the leaves of common goutweed, Derris trifoliata.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Common goutweed, Derris trifoliata.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Hedge mustard, Sinapis arvensis. This annual herb is a widespread weed in fields and lawns, and is easily transplanted by gardeners.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A shrubby American plantain, Plantago major.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Common mallow, Malva neglecta. Common mallow is a ubiquitous flowering weed that can reach heights of over six feet.

Credit: Mark Spangler

An early flowering common mallow, Malva neglecta.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Common reed, Phragmites australis. In temperate regions, common reed grows naturally in ponds, slow-moving rivers and canals.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A shrubby American plantain, Plantago major.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A view of the stem of common mallow, Malva neglecta.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A view of the stems of common mallow, Malva neglecta.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Tare, common tare, Typha angustifolia. Tare is the most commonly encountered marsh grass in North America and Asia.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A view of the stems of common reed, Phragmites australis.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Littorella, common liverwort, Littorella octonaria. Littorella is a common, attractive moss in woodlands and forests in North America.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Empetrum nigrum, winter-cress, grows on moist forest floors, the edges of forests and around the bases of trees in the wild.

Credit: Mark Spangler

Marsh pennywort, Hydrocotyle ranunculoides, is a small, gray-green, aquatic plant with a single thread-like leaf, floating in shallow, brackish water.

Credit: Mark Spangler

An arctic bog orchid, Siphonanthus arcticus. Arctic bogs have several species of arctic orchids that are among the coldest-living plants on Earth.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A floating bog orchid, Siphonanthus arcticus, is a small, gray-green plant with small, simple, hairy leaves.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A marsh pennywort, Hydrocotyle ranunculoides, is a small, gray-green, aquatic plant with a single thread-like leaf, floating in shallow, brackish water.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A bog orchid, Siphonanthus arcticus, is a small, gray-green plant with simple, hairy leaves.

Credit: Mark Spangler

This flower is an aster fimbriatus, a western coastal species of aster or common goldenrod. It is found in open woods and in disturbed areas.

Credit: Mark Spangler

This flower is an aster fimbriatus, a western coastal species of aster or common goldenrod. It is found in open woods and in disturbed areas.

Credit: Mark Spangler

This flower is a western species of aster or common goldenrod, Aster fimbriatus.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A native wood sorrel, Oxalis oregana, is a slender annual herb that can be found in moist or wet places.

Credit: Mark Spangler

An umbellate flower is a type of flower that contains a cluster of flowers. The umbrella shaped flower cluster is formed when a cluster of flowers with the same genetic makeup come together and form a flower cluster. In other words, the flowers can look like they're growing in a basket or umbrella.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A flower is the reproductive organ of a plant. It produces and stores food to feed the developing embryo or seed. Flowers can be found on the flowers, stems, leaves and roots of plants. In some species flowers are actually male, female or both.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A flower is the reproductive organ of a plant. It produces and stores food to feed the developing embryo or seed. Flowers can be found on the flowers, stems, leaves and roots of plants. In some species flowers are actually male, female or both.

Credit: Mark Spangler

A flower is the reproductive organ of a plant. It produces and stores food to feed the developing embryo or seed. Flowers can be found on the flowers, stems, leaves and roots of plants. In some species flowers are actually male, female or both.

Credit: Mark Spangler

The flower bud, inflorescence, calyptrochymome, is the organ produced by the inflorescence that holds the flower. It is the organ that determines the sex of the flower.

Credit: Mark Spangler

The calyptrochymome is the